This is a Living Document [created 29 June 2006]

Computer Science Courses at SCC Have Been Killed

At 10:00am MST on 29 June 2006 I learned that Computer Science (CSC) at Scottsdale Community had been discontinued. [Note: Somebody with more power than me at SCC used the word "killed."]

Computer Science at SCC was "killed" while we are transitioning into the next era of computing (i.e. 21st century Informatics enabled by High-Performance Computing).

Computer Science at SCC was "killed" while the Ira A. Fulton School of Engineering at Arizona State University was working on becoming a producer of 21st century engineers and scientists.

Computer Science at SCC was "killed" while TGen, the Biodesign Institute at ASU, and BIO5 at the University of Arizona are working hard bringing biotechnology to the Valley of the Sun and the state of Arizona. [Bioinformatics is a major component of biotechnology and bioinformatics requires Computer Science.]

Computer Science at SCC was killed while Google Inc. -- a 21st century Informatics company -- was establishing a home in the Valley of the Sun seeking a never ending stream of computing gurus. [It is only a matter of time before we see biogoogle and nanobiogoogle.]

Computer Science at SCC was killed by a dean of instruction who quit SCC and quit the Maricopa County Community Colleges to become president of Clovis Community College located in Clovis, New Mexico. [If this dean wanted to be a college President, SCC is going to need a new President sooner rather than later. Why did this dean leave? I want to see his exit interview.] Somebody who quit SCC and quit the MCCCD should not have had the unconditional power to do what he did.

Computer Science at SCC was killed for one valid reason: zero enrollments. [Note: CSC100 ("Computer Science for Non-CS Majors") was scheduled for Fall 2006, but it was unconditionally cancelled while having an enrollment of six. This class had a chance of "making."]

Computer Science Courses (CSC) within the Maricopa Community Colleges support two pathways for students: articulation to Computer Science courses at Arizona universities (with emphasis on Arizona State University) and continuing education (life long learning about computing). CSC at SCC has never established a pipeline to CS/CSE at ASU; however, during the late-20th century, the CSC continuing education pathway had healthy enrollments and all was good.

CSC at SCC enrollments have been virtually zero ever since the computer profession solidly handled the Y2K computing defect and the dot-com correction of 2001. In addition, the Valley of the Sun's growing bioindustry has not help increase demand for Computer Science at SCC. During this time span, marketing efforts by SCC (and the Maricopa Community Colleges) to promote Computer Science have been nil. CSC at SCC has zero connections with any K-12 schools.

21st century computing is Informatics and High-Performance Computing. Informatics enables bio-informatics, financial-informatics, social-informatics, environmental-informatics, weather-informatics, community-informatics and so on. Each domain specific informatics has potentially-infinite forms. Example: ASU's initial form of bioinformatics is biomedical-informatics. Informatics enables advances in 21st century healthcare. Informatics and HPC require Computer Science. SCC has "killed" Computer Science; therefore, SCC has "killed" Informatics and High-Performance Computing.

Bioinformatics is a keyword. The prefix bio is a specialization of informatics. Informatics requires HPC. SCC has "killed" Informatics and HPC; therefore, SCC has "killed" bioinformatics (along with biomedical-informatics and all other forms of healthcare related informatics). Currently, nursing students are not required to take a Computer Science course; therefore, SCC did not "kill" healthcare. [Note: CSC at SCC believes all healthcare students should be required to take at least one Computer Science course (at a minimum: "CSC180 -- Computing for Scientists, Engineers and Medical/Health Specialists").

Social networking and computational engineering are keywords. SCC has "killed" Informatics; therefore, it has "killed" social-informatics and community-informatics. SCC has "killed" HPC; therefore, it has "killed" computational engineering which this includes specializations such as computational biology and other forms of scientific computational computing.

On 6 July 2006, "google" was added as a verb to the Merriam-Webster dictionary, but SCC has "killed" Computer Science. During the late-20th century, CSC students at SCC learned about Google when its web address was http://google.stanford.edu. These days Google is a 21st century Informatics company while Computer Science at SCC is dead.

CSC at SCC has gone from this in October 2003...

[SCC does Bioinformatics]

to this in June of 2006...

[SCC kills CSC]

Creator: Gerald D. Thurman [gthurman@gmail.com]
Created: 29 June 2006


Academic and Continuation Education Pathways

During the 2001-2004 time frame, I was doing both CSC and CIS instruction, but due to institutional dysfunction (and declining CIS enrollments), I was no longer allowed to conduct CIS courses.

Fall 2002: I failed to get a sabbatical award. [Update knowledge in CS. One SCC (CSC/CIS/CTI). One Maricopa (curriculum/community).]

Fall 2002: I began learning about biotechnology/bioscience.

Summer 2003: I began about learning about nanotechnology/nanoscience.

Fall 2003: 1-credit and 2-credit versions of CSC294 -- "Special Topics in Computing" was officially added to the MCCCD course bank. [CSC294 provides flexibility with respect to offering timely continuing education Computer Science courses.]

Fall 2003: I failed to get a sabbatical award. [Update knowledge in CS. One SCC (CSC/CIS/CTI). One Maricopa (curriculum/community). Customized textbooks with O'Reilly Media and Silicon Valley-based Foothill College.]

Fall 2003: Received Prop. 301 money to build a computing cluster to support learning about bioinformatics.

Fall 2004: I taught my first math course (MAT082 "Basic Arithmetic").

Fall 2004: CSC180 -- "Computing for Scientists, Engineers and Medical/Health Specialists" was officially added to the MCCCD course bank. [All science, engineering and math students must meet a CS (Computer/Statistic) requirement and CSC180 satisfies that requirement for these students. Other students take CSC180; however, a majority of them will continue taking non-CSC courses to satisfy their CS degree/certificate requirements.

Fall 2004: I did not submit a sabbatical proposal (and this was a mistake on my part).

Fall 2004: I did two math classes.

Fall 2004: I shutdown my mailing-lists losing contact with all former students.

Spring 2005: A DRAFT of "Potential New Continuing Education MCCCD CSC Courses" was created along with a DRAFT for the continuing education specialization: "Learning About Unix Systems, Programming and System Administration." The CSC Instruction Council provides zero feedback.

Spring 2005: I invented BABs (Basic Arithmetic Bits) as part of my FEP (Faculty Evaluation Plan). Prop. 301 cluster up and running; zero interest.]

Spring 2005: I recruited TGen's Dr. John Carpten to give a bioscience-related talk as part of the Kelly Lecture series.

Fall 2005: CSC283 -- "Bioinformatics and Scientific Computing" officially added to the MCCCD course bank.

Fall 2005: I failed to get sabbatical award. [Update knowledge in CS. The sabbatical was about 21st century Informatics and High-Performance Computing and it finished dead last in the sabbatical award rankings established by Maricopa County Community College residential faculty.]

Summer 2006: I collaborated with ASU on a grant proposal to establish curriculum that would form the framework for computational engineering and scientific computing using the cyber-infrastructure. [The grant was not awarded.]

Summer 2006: On 29 June 2006, CSC is killed at SCC. Note: This took place after the ASU grant had been submitted.]

Fall 2006: 1-credit "Survey of Nanotechnology" added to the MCCCD course bank.

Spring 2007: I recruited Dr. Matt Kim to give a Nanotechnology talk as part of the Kelly Lecture series (February).

Spring 2007: SCC hosts the 2nd Annual Symposium of the non-profit Arizona Nanotechnology Cluster. [Collective IQ on the SCC was off the map that day. SCC student won $500 essay nano-related essay contest.]

Spring 2007: I gave a "The Next Era in Computing" talk as part of the Kelly Lecture Series (April).

Summer 2007: I collaborated with ASU on a grant proposal to establish curriculum that would form the framework for computational engineering and scientific computing using the cyber-infrastructure. [The grant was not awarded.]

Spring 2008: SCC hosts the 3rd Annual Symposium of the non-profit Arizona Nanotechnology Cluster.

Spring 2008: Nanonewbies gave a presentation. We offered a 1-credit "Survey of Nanotechnology" class, but it didn't make.

Fall 2008: Robotics club started by Bill Johnson at SCC. Robotics team mentors kids at a Scottsdale Boys and Girls Club and participates in the Avnet games.]

Fall 2008: Nanonewbies gave a presentation. We offered the "Survey in Nanotechnology" class, but it didn't make.

Spring 2009: I gave a "20 Petaflops in 2012" talk as part of the Kelly Lecture Series.

Spring 2009: ASU becomes for first university to offer an undgraduate degree in biomedical informatics.

Spring 2009: Nanonewbies gave a presentation.

Spring 2009: Robotics team participates in Avnet games. [An SCC student (who is going to be a CS major at SCC beginning in the fall) received a summer computing-related internship at TGen and a Helios Scholarship. This student also received the math department's "outstanding math student" award at the 2009 Excellence Under the Stars award celebration.]

Spring 2009: 3-credit nanotechnology approved by ICs and will probably get added to the MCCCD course bank.

Spring 2009: Dan Stanzione announces he is leaving ASU's High Performance Computing Initiative to become Deputy Directory of the Texas Advanced Computing Center at the University of Texas.

Spring 2009: The ACM reports that CS enrollments are up for the first time in six years. Up 6.2% from last year; CS major up 8.1%. CS undergrads earn 13% more than other science/engineering undergrads. Women in computing unchanged at 11.3% of students.

Spring 2009: Met twice with two CS professors at ASU and we're going to work in an ATE (Advanced Technology Education) grant proposal during the summer.

During the 21st century, I attended ATF (Articulation Task Force) meetings. [I want to note that I attended many of the ATF meetings at my own expense.]

During the 21st century, I have been active in the CSC Instructional Council. Only three other Maricopa Community Colleges have been active CSC IC members and they are Mesa, Glendale, Chandler/Gilbert.

During the 21st century, I attended the TGen groundbreaking and beam-topping ceremonies, the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University grand opening, and the SkySong groundbreaking.

During the 21st century, I attended Tempe Techie Tuesdays, the first few bioindustry breakfasts, ASU Discovery Tours, and some of the meetings of the MCCCD Biocommission.