About the Number 59 (fifty-nine)

While creating a nBAB for the number 233, MathBabbler learned that 233 was an Eisenstein prime. During his CSC100 class on 7 April 2009, he modified the MBNA to check if a prime number is an Eisenstein prime. He noticed that he had nBABs for all Eisenstein primes less than 100 except for the prime number 59.

   MathBabbler Number Analyst (MBNA) output:
   =========================================
   59 is a natural, whole, integer
   59 is odd
   59 proper divisors are: 1,
   59 is deficient (sum of divisors is 1)
   59 is unhappy
   59 is not a Harshad number
   59 is prime
   ...Safe prime with 29
   ...Sexy prime with 53
   ...Twin prime with 61
   ...OEIS:002145 (4n+3; n=14)
   ...Super
   ...Right-truncatable
   ...Eisenstein
   59 is undulating
   59 in octal is 073
   59 in hexadecimal is 0x3b
   59 in binary is 111011 (is odious)
   59 nearest square numbers: -10...5 (49...64 [8])
   sqrt(59) = 7.68115
   ln(59) = 4.07754
   log(59) = 1.77085
   59 reciprocal is .01694915254237288135593220338983
   59! is 1.38683e+80
   59 is 18.7803 Pi years
   59 is 2 score and 19 years
   59 written as a Roman numeral is LIX

The nBAB for number 59 was the first nBAB created using a MBNA that checked for Eisenstein primes.

[Wikipedia] 59 is a Pillai prime. A Pillai prime is a "prime number p for which there is an integer n > 0 such that the factorial of n is one less than a multiple of the prime, but the prime is not one more than a multiple of n." {OEIS.org::id:A063980}

Update::2009.08.11

John Hughes died at the age of 59 on 6 August 2009. MathBabbler's favorite Hughes movie was Planes, Trains and Automobiles (especially the beginning), with National Lampoon's Vacation a close second.

Note: Since the last time this nBAB was updated, the MBNA (MathBabbler Number Analyst) was modified to check for ThurmNumbers. A ThurmNumber is a number that when written in score plus number form results in a prime numbered score plus a prime number. 59 is a ThurmNumber because it is 2 score 19 and both 2 and 19 are prime numbers.


Creator: Gerald Thurman [gthurman@gmail.com]
Created: 08 April 2009

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