BARS::Bridge Sign in Arizona Evaluates to 'pi'

This bridge sign is located along old US Hwy-80 that connects Tonopah with Gila Bend. { the bridge} {the bridge}

The sign says...

   +---------------------------+
   |      B R I D G E          |
   | height clearance 13' 6''  |
   |    width clearance 18'    |
   | maximum weight 40,000 lbs |
   +---------------------------+
   the numbers are: 13  6  18  40,000

   the math is: sqrt(sqrt(40000)) - (18 - 13 + 6) = Pi (3.14)
   
   observe...
      sqrt(40,000) = 200
        sqrt(200)     = 14.1421356
      - (18 - 13 + 6) = 11.0000000
      -----------------------------
                         3.1421356
                   Pi =  3.14159265

   [solve for 'n']  sqrt(sqrt(40000)) - (18 - n + 6) = Pi (3.14)
About BARs Analysis

The square root function is handy for reducing large numbers into smaller numbers. MathBabbler adopted RoadSignMath.com's policy of allowing square root without requiring a two.

The square root of 40,000 was clear, but we were unable to work with the resulting 200. Out of curiosity we did a square root of 200 and noticed the .14 in the result. We observed that if 11 could be subtracted from 14, we'd have an approximation of Pi. It didn't take long to get the remaining three numbers to evaluate to 11.

Exercises
   2000 lbs per ton
   12 inches per inch
   3 feet per yard
  1. The height clearance is _______ inches.

  2. The width clearance _______ yards.

  3. The maximum weight is _______ tons.

Update::2010.03.25

This BARS was selected to be a BARS of the Week for week #10 of the Spring 2010 semester.

   the numbers are: 13  6  18  40,000

   the math is:  40000 % 13 + 6 = 18

   BARSfunc rsStateEval:  spf(40000) + 13 + 18 / 6 = 48
   * Arizona was the 48th state admitted to the Union.
   * spf(n) = the sum of the prime factors of n
   * spf(40000) = 2+2+2+2+2+2+5+5+5+5 = 32

   BARSfunc off-by-one rsAgeEval:  spf(sqrt(40000)) + 13 + 6 + 18 = 52+1
   * MathBabbler was 52 years young when he found this equation.
   * sqrt(40000) = 100; spf(200) = 2+2+2+5+5 = 16

Creator: Gerald D. Thurman [gthurman@gmail.com]
Created: 13 March 2006

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 United States License.